Hannah Imlach | John Muir Residency Blog

Hannah Imlach | Hexagonal Island Host & Dune Cradle

Ledodendron Fossil found with local geologist Fiona McGibbon. Image Credit: Hannah Imlach

Visual Artist Hannah Imlach took part in the John Muir Residency with North Light Arts during May and June 2017. Her residency focussed on the developed of an existing work (Hexagonal Island Host, 2014) inspired by the geology of the coastline of East Lothian, and the creation of a new site-specific sculpture (Dune Cradle, 2017) inspired by coastal flora. Hexagonal Island Host and Dune Cradle were exhibited in the Floers exhibition at Dunbar Town House Museum and Gallery with Alec Finlay during June 2017.

Fiona describing geological processes at Thorntonloch. Image Credit: Hannah Imlach

During her onsite residency in Dunbar, Hannah revisited Hexagonal Island Host in a new moving image work created with filmmaker Daniel Warren. This piece documents the sculpture in the limestone rock bowls that sit between Whitesands and Barnsness, thought to have been carved by the root balls of an ancient mangrove-like plant, the Lepidodendron. Hexagonal Island Host was inspired by this unique area of exposed geology, where fossilised remains describe a tropical swampland of the Carboniferous. Hannah benefitted from the generosity and expertise of local geologist Fiona McGibbon and took the residency opportunity to reconnect with Fiona and walk the coast, collecting fossils that were included within the Floers exhibition. To read more about Hexgonal Island Host and watch the new moving image documentation, please visit: www.hannahimlach.com/Hexagonal-Island-Host

Filming Hexagonal Island Host with filmmaker Daniel Warren and Thomas Butler recording sound. Image Credit: Felicity Bristow

Filming Hexagonal Island Host with filmmaker Daniel Warren and Thomas Butler recording sound. Image Credit: Felicity Bristow

Hannah also walked with environmental specialist Colin Will to explore and discuss the flora of the intertidal zone. For her 2017 commission, Hannah worked on a body of research considering the future of coastal plant life in the face of increasingly unstable weather events and rising global sea levels. This included research into the ecology of dynamic dune systems and architecture used in environments inundated by water. The outcome, Dune Cradle, was developed using drawing and 3D modelling, and created using balsa wood and powder-coated steel. An animation of the Dune Cradle model can be viewed here: vimeo.com/222274723

3D virtual models of Dune Cradle. Image Credit: Hannah Imlach

3D virtual models of Dune Cradle. Image Credit: Hannah Imlach

3D virtual models of Dune Cradle. Image Credit: Hannah Imlach

Dune Cradle was temporarily installed at Belhaven Bay during June 2017 as part of the Floers Festival programme, incorporating a guided walk and poems by Colin Will and the reading of a commissioned essay by researcher and poet Lila Matsumoto. To read Lila’s essay and view more images of the completed work please visit: www.hannahimlach.com/Dune-Cradle

Dune Cradle (Balsa wood, powder coated steel, sand and dune flora, 2017). Image Credit: Hannah Imlach